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Modern Warfare 3 developer is investigating an exploit that lets plays sprint while lying prone


Call of Duty: Modern Warfare 3 developer Sledgehammer Games says it’s investgating a new exploit called ‘Snake 2.0’.

The exploit lets players sprint while lying in the prone position on the floor.

This gives players a clear advantage, because it lets them travel around the map quickly while being much harder to shoot because they’re a smaller, lower target.

X account Pullze Check posted a video showing the exploit in action, and stating that it should be called ‘Snaking 2.0’.

It also notes that the exploit can only be used by players using a keyboard and mouse. However, since the game is cross-play it will still affect console players using a controller.

“We’re investigating an exploit that allows players to sprint while appearing in the prone animation,” the official Call of Duty Updates X account posted.

This was then replied to by the official Sledgehammer Games account, which posted emojis showing a snake being crossed out.

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Activision claimed this week that Modern Warfare 3 has seen record engagement levels compared to its predecessors.

“Thank you for a historic launch,” it said on Tuesday. “Just two weeks in, MWIII has already set records with the highest engagement in the new Modern Warfare Trilogy!”

According to the publisher, the game has seen “more hours per player overall” than 2019’s Modern Warfare and last year’s Modern Warfare 2.

What’s probably more telling than the game’s engagement stats is what hasn’t been announced – sales figures and revenue generated.

While there isn’t much publicly available Modern Warfare 3 sales data yet, physical sales during its launch week in the UK were down 25% compared to those of its predecessor.