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The Case of the Golden Idol is getting a sequel set in the 1970s


Critically acclaimed detective puzzle game The Case of the Golden Idol is getting a sequel.

The Rise of the Golden Idol is in development at Color Gray Games and due to be published in 2024 by Playstack.

Case of the Golden Idol, which released last year for PC and this year for Nintendo Switch, tasked players with solving 12 deaths spanning 50 years in the 18th century.

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It was well received by critics, earning it scores of 84 (PC) and 93 (Switch) on review aggregation site Metacritic.

In comparison, the sequel will challenge players to uncover the truth behind 15 crimes in the 1970s.

The series is coming to new platforms too, with a release planned for PC, Switch, PlayStation and Xbox consoles, and mobile via Netflix.

The debut trailer, which is viewable above, premiered during The Game Awards on Thursday night.

A product description on the game’s Steam page reads: “Three centuries following the unspeakable fate of the Cloudsleys, the legend of the Golden Idol has all but faded. Now it is carried only in small whispers, uttered as an obscene myth.

“Some are determined for this to change.

“The Rise of the Golden Idol follows a tenacious relic hunter on a quest to unearth the powerful artifact that – if the legend is true – can reshape the world.

“As the observer, you must investigate 15 strange cases of crime, death and depravity. Like before with The Case of the Golden Idol, you are free to investigate however you wish and build your own theory.

“You must make sense of a grand mystery that unravels across an age of hallucinogens, fax machines, parapsychology and TV guides.

“Enlightenment seekers, convicts, chat show hosts and corporate middle management will all have a role to play in the wider mysteries that unfold. Like always, many of these subjects will have their own motives. Some will be carrying more than agendas.”